The crucial cry of the Reformation, as it is also the radical problem of man in his fallenness, was: “How can a man be justified with God?” (Job 25:4) In view of its cardinal significance, not least in those days of renewal, it is not surprising that Luther should have called justification by faith the article of a standing or falling Church. It was, however, a doctrine which needed very careful definition and explanation if it was not to be misapplied and misrepresented. This the Reformers were soon to learn. It is not faith as such and by itself that justifies. Indeed, there can be no such thing as bare faith; for faith must have an object. And the object of Christian faith is Christ. The Reformed doctrine of justification by faith alone does not mean by faith in isolation. It means that, where man’s salvation is concerned, there is, negatively, no room at all for any notion of human merit, and, positively, there is only room for the merit of Christ.


As the title indicates, this article by Philip E. Hughes deals with the subject of justification. It is crucial, particularly at this time where this doctrine is being assailed, perhaps even more so than during the time of the Reformation, that it be established firmly in the minds of all who profess to hold fast to Christ alone for their salvation.

In this article, the author deals with the following sub-topics:

- BY FAITH ALONE
- BY GRACE ALONE
- FAITH AND WORKS
- WORKS AND MERIT
- PURGATORY AND PRAYERS FOR THE DEAD
- THE ORDER OF SALVATION
- JUSTIFICATION BEFORE CHRIST’S ADVENT

You can read this article here: Justification, by Philip E. Hughes.

Or, for later reading, go to Calvinism and the Reformed Faith and click on the Sola Fide button on the left.

In His service and grace,
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simul iustus et peccator